Canada lists jobs in fastfood service industry no longer eligible for LMO The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) yesterday bared that as part of Canada’s moratorium on Temporary Foreign Worker Program in Canada, several jobs in the fastfood service industry is no longer qualified for Labor Market Opinion, or LMO. “An LMO is a basic document required of employers to certify a vacancy in employment position that a local worker has not filled up with an expression of intent to employ a named foreign worker,” Labor and Employment Secretary Rosalinda Dimapilis-Baldoz yesterday said. Among the jobs listed as ineligible for LMO are the following: food counter attendants, kitchen helpers, and related occupations; restaurant and food service managers; food service supervisors; food and beverage servers; cashiers; chefs; cooks; bakers; sales, marketing and advertising managers; retail trade manager; accommodation service managers; other services managers; retail trade supervisors; executive housekeepers; dry cleaning and laundry supervisors; cleaning supervisors; other services supervisors; technical sales specialists-wholesale trade; butchers, meat cutters, and fishmongers-retail and wholesale; sales representatives-wholesale trade (non-technical); retail salespersons and sales clerks; maîtres d’hotel/ and hosts/hostesses; bartenders; other personal service occupations; grocery clerks and store shelf stockers; other elemental sales occupations; security guards and related occupations; light duty cleaners; specialized cleaners; janitors, caretakers, and building superintendents; dry cleaning and laundry occupations; ironing, pressing, and finishing occupations; other elemental service occupations. In a report to the Secretary, Labor Attache to Toronto Leonida V. Romulo said that the moratorium was instituted in response to serious allegations of the abuse on the TFWP by some employers in the said industry. “No new applications will be received for occupations in the list and LMO applications that have yet to receive decision will be cancelled,” Labatt Romulo said in her report. Federal Employment Minister Jason Kenney said that the move was necessary to send a message that the government mean what it says about the obligation actively to search for Canadian first. The announcement on the identified jobs ineligible for LMO met reactions from different groups affected by the moratorium. Dan Kelly, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, said that the government decision was a “trial and conviction by media examples”. He forecasts that there will be business closures, especially in small communities, resort communities, and in resort areas, if the moratorium lasts for months. Restaurant owners in some pocket of regions across the country are finding it difficult to find cooks and kitchen helpers as people are unwilling to move their families across Canada to go and work in a small Alberta or Saskatchewan town just to work in a pizza place, Kelly added. The Philippine Overseas Labor Office (POLO) in Toronto will continue monitoring the developments on the issue. End/rhev

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